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Posts Tagged ‘ICT4Accountability’

IDS Research Evaluates TRAC FM

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The ICT4Accountability project successfully transformed from a theoretical blog into a practical method – Called TRAC FM – that is now deployed in 4 african countries at over 36 radio stations in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Somalia.

As the concept of TRAC FM is based on research conducted in 2009, we are happy that our work in the field remains relevant to academic debate. UK based IDS (Institute for Development Studies) is a leading global charity for international development research, teaching and communications. In 2012 IDS was asked by Hivos to conduct research into the effectiveness of T4TAIs. TRAC FM was picked as a case study and worked with IDS to share data and contacts.

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Aid, Accountability and ICT4D

December 1, 2010 2 comments
Corruption is one of the biggest evils in Africa. Fundamental issues concerning development of the continent lead back to the problems surrounding influential men trying to absorb as much resources as they can get their hands on while others die of malnutrition or easily prefentable disease. Uganda is one of the most fertile countries in the world, yet, people die of hunger. During the past 5 month stay in Uganda, I did research on the way citizens in Uganda are able to check up on their leaders and their ability to hold them accountable for the management of the country. Within this question I focussed on the way (new) media technologies could play a part in monitoring and creating awareness, transparency and consequent accountability.

Civic media, Community media, Citizen media, Citizen Journalism?

November 8, 2010 Leave a comment
How can citizens effectively organize, share, take action and do all the other things we want to do with the new power we have acquired through our electronic networks, when we cannot even get a consensus on essential words defining our practices? What is the difference between citizen journalism, social media, community media, participatory journalism, and civic media? These are just a few names of the wide variety of new terms indicating something ‘new’ is happening in the way the average man can contribute to public debate. The big problem however, is our collective problem of structuring this debate into something valuable.